Month / April 2021

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  • Dentist

    Job search—with obstacles

    Five years after arriving in Germany, 28 percent of female refugees and 60 percent of male refugees were employed.

    One key reason for this gap is that in many cases, refugee women worked in sectors such as education and health in their counties of origin. Qualifications earned in these sectors are often not recognized in Germany.

    Another factor are qualifications gained in Germany. Refugee women attend language and integration courses and employment counseling at a later point in time than refugee men. These courses and services play an important role in finding a job in Germany.

    The task of caring for children and being gainfully employed poses an additional challenge for refugee women who arrived in Germany in recent years.

    The researchers at IAB and BIM emphasize that tailoring policy measures to the specific needs of refugee women could help to promote their integration into the German labor market. The expansion of childcare services, for instance, could benefit them and non-refugee women as well.


    Further information

    MIGAZIN: Refugee women must overcome many obstacles for labor market integration

    IAB: Labor market integration of refugee women slower than for men

    All results in the overview

    Foto von Evelina Zhu von Pexels

  • sleeping woman with glasses

    How are people doing in the pandemic?

    Over the course of the Corona pandemic, people have become less satisfied overall. Leisure activities and family life are a source of frustration for many.
    The good news is that for many people, satisfaction in certain areas of life has increased during the pandemic. Many adults rate both their health and their sleep as significantly better than before.

    According to SOEP director Stefan Liebig, “When faced with the threat of the pandemic, you can disregard the little twinge in your back.” He also offers an explanation for the increase in satisfaction with sleep: “Working from home eliminates the need for long commutes to work.” These are just some of the results of an additional telephone survey of more than 12,000 “Living in Germany” respondents on the topic of life during the COVID-19 pandemic.


    Further information

    Berliner Zeitung: Wie geht es uns in der Pandemie?

    SOEP-CoV Spotlight: Während der Corona-Pandemie sind die Menschen zunehmend unzufrieden mit der Freizeit, aber weiterhin zufrieden mit ihrem Schlaf

    All results in the overview

    Photo by Isabella and Zsa Fischer on Unsplash

  • two women talking

    Increasing German Language Proficiency and Closer Social Relationships with Germans

    Results from a study based on data from “Living in Germany” show steady improvement in German language skills among refugees who arrived in Germany between 2013 and 2016. As of 2019, five out of 10 refugees rated their German skills as “good” to “very good”. The study was carried out by researchers Wenke Niehues, Nina Rother, and Manuel Siegert from the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF). Results also show that refugees are spending increasing amounts of time with Germans, especially in work and educational settings.

    However, older refugees, refugees with poorer German skills, and refugee women with small children need more time to build social relationships with Germans. They also run the risk of falling behind in the development of language skills and social contact.

    Study results also indicate that refugees’ social contact decreased again during the pandemic, and that many refugees’ language skills may have plateaued or declined.


    Further information

    BAMF: Bessere Deutschkenntnisse und mehr soziale Kontakte bei Geflüchteten

    All results in the overview

    Photo by Amy Hirschi on Unsplash

  • older woman (PoC) smiles and holds a cup

    Older refugees in Germany

    The large majority of refugees who have come to Germany in recent years are relatively young. Only about 12 percent of all refugees living in Germany are 45 or older. These individuals face particular challenges. Compared to younger refugees, they often find it more difficult to learn German, find a job, and make friends in Germany. These are among the findings from a study conducted by the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF) based on data from “Living in Germany.”

    Many older refugees are worried about their application for asylum (52%), about not being able to stay in Germany (66%), and about having to return to their country of origin (73%). They also worry about their financial situation and health.

    And yet, all in all, older refugees are approximately as satisfied with their lives as younger refugees are. The author of the study, Amrei Maddox, suspects that one reason for this is the older generation’s stronger family ties: Most older refugees live with family members.


    Further information

    BAMF: Older refugees in Germany

    BAMF: Living situations of older refugees in Germany

    All results in the overview

    Photo by Mehmet Turgut Kirkgoz on Unsplash